[SLIDESHOW] Underground Mine Transforms into Underground Museum

By Admin
The former Salina Turda Salt Mines in Transylvania, Romania have been converted into the worlds largest underground museum. Descending almost 400 feet i...

The former Salina Turda Salt Mines in Transylvania, Romania have been converted into the world’s largest underground museum. Descending almost 400 feet into the Earth, the site has become a haven for visitors all across the world.

The mine, which was first established in the 17th century, includes three levels covering three different mines – the Terezia, Rudolg, and Gizela mines. The massive mine was formed completely by hand and machine rather than using explosives.

At 140 feet down, the mine includes a 180-seat amphitheater and carousel. At 370 feet down, the mine provides access to a small lake where boats can be rented. A large rotating wheel allows visitors to see the stalagmites throughout the cave. 

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